MY BELOVED HOME TOWN ~ I grew up in the Pacific Northwest in an area called the "Inland Northwest" that includes Spokane and other small towns in Eastern Washington and North Idaho's "Panhandle." This region is a wonderful place to live, raise families, retire and celebrate all four seasons.

SPOKANE FALLS ~ Thundering through the center of Downtown Spokane, dozens of folks visit these falls each year. With several other acclaimed local artists in 2016, my portrait of the falls and Monroe Street Bridge was part of William Grant Gallery's "Just the Bridge" fine art exhibit. Find it below in the "The Downtown District" section.

MANITO PARK ~ On the South Hill, resplendent with gardens like Rose Hill, Lilac, Duncan, plus Davenport Fountain, Mirror Lake, and Park Bench Café, visitors will find beautiful Manito Park. I've painted over a dozen portraits of it. See two below in the "Inland Northwest Parks & Gardens" section.

SPRING • MANITO PARK'S 2ND ANNUAL ART EVENT ~ JUNE 11TH & SUMMER • ARBOR CREST ART & GLASS FEST ~ AUGUST 20TH & 21ST

THANKS MOTHER NATURE & "THE FRIENDS OF MANITO" ~ This hard working stewardship organization (TheFriendsOfManito.org) scheduled their second annual art event in the coldest, rainiest Spring to date. (Who knew?!?) But, miraculous weather = miraculous success! It sprinkled during set-up and breakdown, but the rest of the day was filled with glorious SUNSHINE ~ creating an amazing day for both the vendors and the crowd. It was one of my BEST art events ever!

Coming Soon! ARBOR CREST'S ART & GLASS FEST ~ It's back after a two-year absence due to COVID challenges. Please visit my Art Venues page for all the details on the upcoming August 20th and 21st weekend art event in Spokane Valley at stunning Arbor Crest Cellars.

 

 

THE BEGINNING ~ In 1871, the first white settler to stake a claim in Spokan Falls ("Falls" was later dropped and an "e" added to Spokane) was Seth Scranton. However, James N. Glover was largely known as the "Father of Spokane" as he shaped the area bordering the falls on both sides of them into a town. The railroad, timber and rich ore from the Inland Northwest brought enormous wealth ~ making millionaires of many, although a huge fire burned most of Spokane in 1889, slowing the city's growth.

KEY PLAYERS ~ Kirtland K. Cutter, Amasa Campbell, Patsy Clark, Daniel C. Corbin, F. Rockwood Moore, James N. Glover, Louis B. Davenport, Francis Cook, Aubrey White, J.J. Browne, A.M. Cannon, J.P. Graves, William Cowles and others gave the area in general and the city in particular, its complexion. These highly successful men built grand mansions for their families and imposing downtown structures to proclaim their wealth. Remarkably, many of are still in immaculate condition.

PRESERVATION & THE TOP 10 ~ After World War II, when other cities were demolishing buildings, an economic slump had folks in Spokane restoring properties. The South Hill in particular is filled with homes built in the '20s, '30s and '40s ~ many as handsome as when originally constructed. Add to that the school system, manicured golf courses, bike trails, beautiful parks and gardens. Manito Park's Mirror Lake with its path around its perimeter is one of Doug and my favorite places ~ beautiful in all seasons. Spokane's very active Spokane Preservationist Advocates (SpokanePreservation.org) respects what a jewel Spokane is and works diligently to keep it that way. See their recent newlsetter on my Welcome and Biography pages. Also, from the 1950s into the late 1990s, property at nearby lakes was still affordable, so families were able to purchase vacation lots in which to spend Spokane's hot dry Summers.

Highlight ~ AARP Magazine rated Spokane among the top 10 regions in the U.S. for its quality of life. "Baby Boomers" who grew up here are coming home.

FULL CIRCLE ~ In 2011, Doug and I moved back to Spokane. We both were born here, although Doug grew up in King County. Fond memories inspired much of the art in this collection, as Spokane has many inspiring subjects for an "Americana" artist like me to re-create. If you grew up here, you'll see lots of beloved familiar settings below.

 

BEST WISHES FOR A BEAUTIFUL SUMMER!

 

SEVEN REGIONAL GROUPS

I've divided my collection into seven groups, some with sub-categories ~ each with two paintings. These highlight neighborhoods, communities and well-known regional areas. I have created 400+ paintings (nearly 250 are of settings in Spokane and the Inland Northwest), so the artwork shared on my website revolves with the seasons and holidays. NOTE ~ I've also completed dozens of sketches for clients ~ some on my Commission page, plus a handful of others at the foot of this and the Puget Sound page.

The groups include ~

 

NEW ARTWORK, MY CREATIVE PROCESS, ENTIRE COLLECTIONS PDFS, AND "THE BIG LIST"

 

ENJOY ~ And click on Ordering for details on purchasing any of the artwork featured here (Visa, MasterCard, Discover and American Express).

 

SPOKANE'S DOWNTOWN DISTRICT ~ HISTORIC LEGENDARY LANDMARK SETTINGS AND STRUCTURES

The Entire Downtown District Collection pdf ~ Click on the 3-page pdf to see and learn about all 11 paintings in "The Downtown District" collection.

NEW! "THE HISTORIC BEAUTIFUL CHANCERY BUILDING" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MAY 2022 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The 1910 Chancery Building was originally designed in the Italian Renaissance-style by Kirtland K. Cutter on Riverside Avenue across from the Spokane Club and east of Our Lady of Lourdes Cathedral. Additional work was completed on it over a decade later in 1924 by another architect, Gustav Pehrson.

Over the decades, the structure housed the offices of the Greater Northwest Life Insurance Company, and most recently, it was the headquarters for Spokane’s Catholic Diocese. During a particularly challenging period, the diocese was forced to sell the structure to satisfy considerable financial responsibilities ~ downsizing from the Downtown District to what was once a library in the Logan neighborhood near Saint Aloysius Grade School.

In 2022, I honored the building as one of Kirtland Cutter’s most outstanding, beautiful creations with this portrait. It was facing possible demolition as the Cowles family who owned it when I completed the artwork, had just announced their intention to build an apartment complex on the land that housed the historic structure.

Highlight ~ One of the couples walking dogs in this friendly scene spent a great deal of time in this elegant structure during the period when the Catholic Diocese owned it, so I included them in its portrait.

 

"FLYING SOUTH OVER SPOKANE FALLS (HUNTINGTON PARK)" (THE DOWNTOWN DISTRICT, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED SEPTEMBER 2004 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Not only did famed architect Kirtland K. Cutter create dozens of beautiful homes and handsome landmark buildings in Spokane, he also lent his design flair to other projects.

This portrayed the majestic Monroe Street Bridge, which spanned the river at the west end of downtown Spokane. In 1910, John Ralston, Spokane’s city engineer and designer of the grand bridge, invited Cutter to design its decorative handrails and lookout stations, which featured life-size reliefs of bison skulls.

The photo here showed the bridge just after its construction. In the background was another famous landmark, the Washington Water Power Post Street Substation. Cutter designed that massive brick and basaltic rock industrial building in 1909.

Recently, Huntington Park situated on the south side of the falls was given a formal restoration with the installation of lawn, a basaltic rock terraced gardens and assorted decorative plantings ~ creating a very inviting space for folks to not only view the cascading water, but stay a while and enjoy a picnic in the scenic spot.

Highlight ~ WWP’s first CEO, Frank Rockwood Moore, gave Cutter one of his first residential commissions ~ a stunning Turdor-Revival (now demolished) on the property between the D.C. Corbin House and the F. Lewis Clark House which later served as the parking lot for the restored Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens.

 

THE "FUN" LANDMARKS ~ SPOKANE'S "FUN" LANDMARKS DOWNTOWN AND THROUGHOUT TOWN ~ REMARKABLE, BUT NOT NECESSILY ON THE HISTORIC REGISTER

"ICE CREAM AT THE BENEWAY CREAMERY" (THE LOWER SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MAY 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

When I was a youngster growing up on Spokane’s South Hill, the weekend began with a stop at the Benewah Creamery’s signature milk bottle dairy store to purchase four gallons of milk ~ enough to last our ever-growing Simpson family for another seven days!

Located on Cedar and Third Avenue, the creamery served the community until 1978. It was one of two structures (originally six were planned) designed by the architectural firm of Whitehouse and Price ~ famous for the Hutton Settlement and other important local buildings. These were built with a fairly hefty price tag of $3,700 each for the times. The North Side bottle building was constructed on Garland Avenue in 1934 and the one pictured here on Cedar Street in 1935. The Great Depression may have been the culprit that allowed for only two of the half dozen planned.

I gave this piece a 1950s theme, including a Ford “Woody” station wagon and vintage teardrop trailer in the parking lot with our friends and family peppered about the scene.

Highlight ~ The Benewah Creamery milk bottles shone throughout the decades as fine examples of “literalist” architecture ~ functioning beautifully as their own advertisements.

 

"LEMONADE & LORIENS ON PERRY STREET (CAMBERN WINDMILL)" (PERRY DISTRICT, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 2019 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The historic Cambern Dutch Shop was one of several windmill buildings constructed by Charles Wood who was once employed by famed architect Kirtland Kelsey Cutter. 13 of these novelty commercial structures were designed and 9 were built.

This one at 1102 South Perry was in immaculate condition when I painted its portrait. In the mid-1920s, brothers Robert and Cecil Cambern housed their bakery/dairy business in the windmill buildings until they closed in 1934 due to financial failure brought on by the Great Depression.

When I created this artwork, Lorien Herbs & Natural Foods had been doing business here since 1977. In keeping with the vintage theme of this piece, I paired the windmill with pal Linda Ebner’s campy green and yellow trailer dressed as a friendly lemonade stand. This painting was created to honor Linda’s milestone birthday and she’s pictured with her husband Joe, lifelong pals John and Maria Herbert and my husband Doug and me.

Highlight ~ Years ago, the remarkable Perry Street windmill was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

 

 

MANITO AND OTHER COUNTY & STATE PARKS AND GARDENS ~ SETTINGS WITHIN SPOKANE'S CITY LIMIITS PLUS STATE PARKS IN THE INLAND NORTHWEST ~ INCLUDING MOUNT SPOKANE

Entire Inland Northwest Parks & Gardens Collection pdf ~ Click on the 6-page pdf to see and learn about all 28 paintings in the "Inland Northwest Parks & Gardens" collection.

 

LEGENDARY MANITO PARK ~ BELOVED TEN-ACRE SOUTH HILL SETTING THAT OPENED TO THE PUBLIC IN 1904

"PICNICKING AT THE PARK BENCH CAFÉ" (MANITO PARK, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 2020 • ACRYLIC-ON-CANVAS • 8X10 -INCH)  

Visitors to Manito Park (TheFriendsOfManito.org) have flocked to the Park Bench Café to place their orders for meals, snacks and beverages, and ice cream since this favorite destination opened in the early 1920s.   

In the park's early days, it included a zoo from 1905 to 1932 with polar and grizzly bears, elk, buffalo and more. At that time, south of Mirror Lake (also known as the Duck Pond) and north Joel E. Ferris Perennial Garden, there was a small pond with a hut in the center of it that housed water fowl.    

In 1923, a decision was made to fill this in and tear down the hut to make space for the new shingle and basaltic rock Park Bench Café. In addition to serving food, Manito Park rented out bicycles here as well for a number of years, but the practice was stopped many decades ago. 

Highlight ~ Music has always been an important part of the park from its creation. When I painted this portrait of the café, concerts were still offered at no charge to the picnicking public on Friday evenings during warm weather months.

 

“DAVENPORT FOUNTAIN AT DUNCAN GARDEN” (MANITO PARK, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JULY 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

In 2015, I updated this painting originally created in 1997 to reflect some of the additional beautiful features in Duncan Garden at Manito Park.

The fountain was donated in 1956 by the Davenport family in the memory of Louis M. Davenport ~ longtime owner of the downtown Spokane landmark hotel by the same name. This remarkable water feature has long been the focal point of the formal European Renaissance-style “Sunken Garden” ~ renamed John W. Duncan Garden to honor the beloved Manito Park superintendent who achieved so much in his mission to expand and make the park the stunning setting we all still enjoy today.

Every Summer since its creation, the large garden has been planted with annuals, creating brilliant rainbows of color ~ making it an ideal setting for weddings, photography for senior pictures, and more. Over the years, “wishing” locals and visitors have tossed coins into the beloved Davenport Fountain.

Highlight ~First Park Superintendent E. Charles Balzer discovered the rich soil when the property was forested and he found his son playing there with some friends. To raise funds for Manito Park, he began selling the loamy soil to other parks and neighbors in the area, ultimately creating the “sunken” effect.

 

 

OTHER CITY AND STATE PARKS ~ CITY PARKS IN ALL NEIGHBORHOODS ~ PLUS STATE PARKS LIKE RIVERSIDE AND MOUNT SPOKANE

NEW! "GATHERING AT THE FOX PARK GAZEBO" (MORAN PRAIRIE, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WASHINGTON • JULY 2022 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

When Doug and I moved further south from our 1937 vintage brick Craftsman on Spokane’s South Hill near Manito Park in 2020, one of the sweetest “extras” that came with our new community on Moran Prairie was a gazebo roomy enough for hosting picnics and other fun gatherings. The gazebo sat in the clearing of tiny Fox Park, thus the title of this piece.

When I finished painting it, COVID was still a bit of a problem, so Doug, I, and others who lived here hadn’t used the gazebo for a gathering like the one pictured here for a long while. But regardless, we all knew a fun, sunny day like this would come ~ which, of course, inspired this piece.

Highlight ~ I showed a glimpse of a 1937 vintage Buick automobile in the lower right with the proud owner (in his “Buick” T-shirt) and his wife behind his “pride and joy.” The Ice cream “Woodie” wagon was a bit of poetic license, but who doesn’t love waffle cones handed out by a merry vendor like the one in this scene?

Entire Inland Northwest Parks & Gardens Collection pdf ~ Click on the 6-page pdf to see and learn about all 28 paintings in the "Inland Northwest Parks & Gardens" collection.

 

"SUMMER FUN AT COMSTOCK IN THE 1950S" (THE SOUTH HILL • PAINTED JUNE 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

In the 1930s, the E.A. Shadles donated 21 acres and $150,000 on the South Hill to create Comstock Park in the name of Mrs. Shadle’s father, former Mayor J.M. Comstock.

Comstock was a very civic minded man who worked actively with the Spokane River Parkways Association to beautify the property around the Spokane River east of town ~ especially near Riverside State Park, Seven Mile and Deep Creek Canyon.

The handsome Comstock pool structure was the work of Whitehouse & Price (also known for their iconic Saint John the Evangelist Cathedral on Grand Boulevard).

In July 1938, Comstock Park was dedicated with its huge state-of-the-art swimming pool. Most of the kids on Spokane’s South Hill learned to swim at Comstock, including most of us Simpson youngsters when we lived four blocks away. I gave this piece a mid-1950s theme, picturing friends and family of all ages enjoying sports and games at the beloved old pool.

Highlight ~ In recent years, the pool was completely rebuilt and expanded into the Comstock Aquatic Center.

 

BROWNE'S ADDITION ~ CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES, "HOME SWEET HOMES" AND THE MAC'S RESTORED AMASA CAMPBELL HOUSE

Entire Browne's Addition Collection pdf ~ Click on the 7-page pdf to see and learn about all 34 (17 Browne's Addition settings / 17 Campbell House) paintings in the "Browne's Addition" collection.

 

BROWNE'S ADDITION SMALL BUSINESSES AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" ~ SPOKANE'S FIRST AND OLDEST NEIGHBORHOOD

NEW! "PINK PALACE ON PACIFIC (AVENUE)" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JANUARY 2021 • ACRYLIC-ON-CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I have painted very few pink residences, as this color home is not easy to find in Spokane, Washington. Frequently, Spokane’s vintage grand houses were Tudor-Revival, Federal, Colonial or Prairie-style and constructed of durable materials like basaltic rock, brick, granite or stucco.

In Port Townsend, Snohomish and Walla Walla ~ communities known for their historic Carpenters’ Gothic Victorians, visitors stand a better chance of finding mansions painted pink.

But, lucky me. I discovered this inviting pink “palace” on Pacific Avenue in Browne‘s Addition near Coeur d’Alene Park. No doubt constructed many decades ago, little was available on its history. It may have been a single-family dwelling that was converted into an apartment house after World War II when the city encouraged this practice to accommodate returning servicemen in need of homes in which to start their families.

Highlight ~ I gave this artwork a gardening theme with my husband Doug and me planting pink impatiens and hydrangeas in the front flower beds.

 

"BALLOONS & BLOSSOMS AT THE 1899 HOUSE B&B" (BROWNE'S ADDITION, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED FEBRUARY 2020 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This handsome historic Victorian, located at the east end of Spokane’s oldest neighborhood at 1728 First Avenue, was designed by renowned architect Loren Rand in 1899 for the Powell family. Edward Louis Powell served the fledgling community as its 10th mayor.

When I finished my portrait of it, Louie Flores and Gillian Cranehahn were the proprietors of this fine inn and private residence, perfectly named “1899 House B&B” (1899-House-Bed-Breakfast.Business.Site). Extensive renovation had been completed on the structure ~ including a restoration of the home’s original exterior color scheme. With helpful grants from Spokane Preservation Advocates (SPA), the couple created an inviting, gracious, hospitable place for folks to stay.

Over the years, Louie and Gillian have been active members in the Browne’s Addition Neighborhood Council. This organization helped ensure the historic preservation of the neighborhood as a formal historic district with assistance from the city’s Historic Preservation Office and SPA.

Highlight ~In 2016, I painted a portrait of Browne’s Addition’s Coeur d’Alene Park (Spokane’s first and oldest) for a raffle that the stewardship group Friends of Coeur d’Alene Park held for nearly a year to raise much needed funds for park improvements. Gillian held the winning ticket and the original painting found a place of honor in the B&B’s Rigsby Suite.

 

 

THE MAC'S AMASA CAMPBELL HOUSE ~ GRACIOUS LIVING FOR THE CAMPBELLS AND THE STAFF WHO LOOKED AFTER THEM IN THE LATE 1800S AND EARLY 1900S

NEW! "TULIPS, TEDDY BEARS AND TWIN BEDS" (CAMPBELL HOUSE, BROWNE'S ADDITION, THE MAC, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2021 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS 5X7-INCH)

I took a bit of poetic license with this guest room next to the Campbell’s Linen room. It was devoid of wallpaper and other accoutrements when I took photos of it over a decade ago when I began work on my Campbell House (NorthwestMuseum.org) collection.

Regardless, the room’s two matching twin-size “posters” were charming and delightful ~ perhaps making it the perfect guest room for visiting youngsters.

In addition to our kittiewinks Andy and Sophie, I included a huge container of multi-colored tulips marching across the fireplace mantle.

Highlight ~ I also tucked two friendly teddy bears into this scene as in 1902, famed Richard Steiff introduced his iconic stuff teddy bears (named for President Theodore Roosevelt) ~ roughly the same time that the Campbells were beginning life in their recently completed home in Browne’s Addition, Spokane’s first and oldest residential neighborhood.

 

"THE LOVELY LINEN ROOM" (CAMPBELL HOUSE, BROWNE'S ADDITION, THE MAC, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JULY 2011 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS 8X10-INCH)

Tucked into the southeast corner of the second floor, this room caught the morning sun and must have been a cheerful place to be on sunny days. The north wall had built-in shelves and drawers for storing the bedding and other fine linens that a fine residence like the Campbell House (NorthwestMuseum.org) required.

Grace and Helen stayed abreast of the latest fashions and shunned ready-to-wear. They visited several salons in New York and ordered garments from there, Boston and San Francisco. Once or twice a year, a fine seamstress used this room for a couple of weeks to measure and sew for the family. I’ve pictured the wire dress form and the sewing machine ~ no electricity required as this apparatus used “foot power.”

Highlight ~ Helen’s elegant tea dress pictured hanging on the shelving in this fine art was selected in 1917 from Eugenia’s Gowns of New York.

 

THE PRESTIGIOUS SOUTH HILL ~ CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN THESE NEIGHBORHOODS ~ CANNON HILL / MANITO / CABLE ADDITIONS, CLIFF PARK, HIGH DRIVE, LOWER SOUTH HILL, MORAN PRIARIE, ROCKWOOD, OVERBLUFF, SOUTH PERRY DISTRICT AND MORE

Entire South Hill Collection pdf ~ Click on the 17-page pdf to see and learn about all 83 intings in the "South Hill" collection.

 

THE SOUTH HILL'S PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES ~ ICONIC CHURCHES, SCHOOLS AND BELOVED SMALL BUSINESSES

"PARISHIONERS AT FIRST PRESBYTERIAN" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MAY 2018 • ACRYLIC-ON-CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Reverend Thomas G. Watson arrived in Spokane, WA from Wisconsin to lead Spokane’s initial First Presbyterian congregation in 1883 when Washington was not yet a state. At the time, there was no formal church building, so services were held in various public settings around the community while funds were raised to build a church.

The first church was located on Monroe and Riverside, but the newspaper negotiated the purchase of the property three short years later and ultimately the Review Building took its place. The congregation moved temporarily to the Falls City Opera House, which burned down in the 1889 Great Spokane Fire.

The second location for a church was the corner of Second Avenue and Jefferson, and ultimately in 1910 to the Gothic Revival-style structure designed by architect Loren Leighton Rand at 318 South Cedar Street. The church was stunning with stained glass windows emulating Paris’ Sainte Chapelle and one of the most imposing pipe organs in Spokane. In the early 1950s, the growing congregation added a gymnasium, classrooms and a commercial-style kitchen.

First Presbyterian Church has remained an iconic Spokane structure for over a century ~ nicknamed irreverently by some as “Hogwarts” after the ornate school of wizardry featured in the popular “Harry Potter” movies.

In 1892, the First Presbyterian Church on Jefferson hosted the funeral of Chief Spokane Gary.

 

"SUNDAY BEST AT SAINT AUGUSTINE'S" (THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED FEBRUARY 2014 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The timeframe of this vintage Saint Augustine's Parish (StAugustineSpokane.CatholicWeb.com) artwork was 1939. Succeeding newly promoted Bishop William Condon, Father Stephen P. Buckley (pictured on the steps) had just been named pastor. He would go on to serve Saint Augustine‘s parish for 30 years.

Famed architect Kirtland K. Cutter designed the structure pictured here and Bishop Augustine Schinner dedicated it in 1915. In the late 1940s, Father Buckley spearheaded building a new church, so this building served the parishioners’ children as a school for decades (I went there in the 1950s and my niece and nephew in the 2000s.)

Highlight ~ When I was youngster, attending Sunday Mass was a special occasion. Folks showed their respect by “dressing” for it. Women chose one of the nicest dresses in their wardrobe ~ finishing their ensembles with hats and gloves. Husbands wore suits and ties and children were neatly turned out in their “Sunday best.” Christmas and Easter hols meant completely new outfits from head to toe. This artwork celebrates both the original church and that fine tradition. (Photo courtesy of Sally Simpson.)

 

 

SOUTH HILL "HOME SWEET HOMES" ~ BUNGALOWS, CAPE CODS, DUTCH COLONIALS, FOURSQUARES, TUDORS, VICTORIANS, AND MORE

“GATHERING AT THE GLOVER MANSION” THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 2013 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Known historically as the “Father of Spokane,” when James Glover built his grand mansion on Spokane’s South Hill, he chose fledgling architect Kirtland K. Cutter who had just begun his career there.

In 1889, Cutter also designed the F. Rockwood Moore home (now demolished) near Glover’s, amid criticism by the local wealthy that these 2 new homes looked too “old and established” ~ actually Cutter’s goal. Accolades for the Glover Mansion (GloverMansion.com) by Dr. Seward Webb (son-in-law of W.H. Vanderbilt) gradually won Spokane over, guaranteeing Cutter a firm place in its architectural history.

Although similar in some respects to the F. Rockwood Moore residence, it is unusual in that the first two floors were constructed of granite instead of the prolific basaltic rock on the South Hill. Banker and partner to Moore, Glover wanted to make a statement with his home and the interior is filled with imposing, yet comfortable details.

Highlight ~ This painting pictured friends and family gathering for an outdoor backyard wedding as the mansion had been converted into an event center years before I painted its portrait.

 

NEW! "ICE CREAM & KIDDOS AT CANNON HILL" (CANNON HILL, THE SOUTH HILL, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MAY SEPTEMBER 2021 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

In December 2018, I finished a portrait of Greg and Lori Arpin’s New England reproduction farmhouse along Latah Creek. After 28 years there, the couple downsized to this sweet Colonial-Revival cottage built in 1921 (garage in 1922) near Cannon Hill Park. Magically from its kitchen window, the home enjoyed a view of Cataldo Catholic School where Lori taught third grade for over 30 years.

Summer meant ice cream! Twin grandsons Charlie and Jack  (note their initialed T-shirts and matching Schwinn one-speeds) were the first ones out the gate when they heard the ice cream truck. Granddaughter Aoife waited eagerly in her woody wagon for her cousins to bring her a tasty treat!

Grandparents Lori and Greg looked on from the garden gate while the kids' parents watched from the porch ~ Megan and Michael (the twin boys) and Sarah and Ian (daughter Aoife).

Phil Brooke, Sr., founding member of Paine, Hamblen, Coffin and Brooke, built the cottage in the 1920s. Within five years, he moved his family across the alley to a Dutch Colonial overlooking Cannon Hillt pond. This Dutch Colonial remained for decades in the Brooke family, as grandson Doug was living there when I painted this piece. More remarkably, Greg Arpin practiced law for years with Phil Brooke III at Paine Hamblen.

Highlight ~ This fine art was updated to be a Christmas gift in September 2021 with the addition of the youngsters' parents on the porch. 


 

 

THE HISTORIC NORTH SIDE ~ SAINT ALOYSIUS GONZAGA COLLECTION, CHURCHES, SCHOOLS, PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN CORBIN PARK, GARLAND, INDIAN TRAIL, LITTLE SPOKANE RIVER, LOGAN, NETTLETON, WEST POINT ROAD, THE UNIVERSITY DISTRICT AND MORE

The Entire North Side Collection pdf ~ Click on the 7-page pdf to see and learn about all 31 paintings in the "North Side" collection.

 

NORTH SIDE'S SAINT ALOYSIUS GONZAGA COLLECTION ~ FATHER JOSEPH CATALDO S.J.'S RENOWNED CHRISTIAN EDUCATION SYSTEM IN SPOKANE

"DAFFODILS IN THE RAIN AT DESMET" (GONZAGA UNIVERSITY, THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • APRIL 2016 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Construction began by John Huetter on Gonzaga University's (Gonzaga.Edu) first and oldest dormitory on 1925. A stonemason and brick layer, Huetter also built College Hall and the Huetter House ~ the old Bishop White Seminary which became the G.U. Alumni House decades later. At a cost of $98,000, the men-only facility originally offered students 72 double rooms.

In 1924, Gonzaga mounted the acclaimed passion play “Golgatha” for Spokane and raised $7,000 towards the cost of the dorm’s construction. On October 25th, 1927, DeSmet Hall opened, followed by a football game between Idaho and Gonzaga. Gonzaga won 12 to 3 and funds from ticket sales also went to the building fund.

In this piece, I pictured folks in shirts spelling out “G.U. Bulldogs” ~ (Left to Right) Teresa and Sean Mulholland (Sean lived in DeSmet Hall and met Teresa at G.U.),Sean’s folks Bill and Carol Mulholland, me and husband Doug (my father was a graduate of G.U. and its law school, and taught night law classes part time after World War II), and Joe and Mary Doohan (Joe graduated from Gonzaga and Mary spent a year in Italy as part of the G.U. Florence program).

Highlight ~ Rumor had it that famous crooner and movie star Bing Crosby was kicked out of school when he threw a piano out of DeSmet Hall ~ untrue as he had already moved to Hollywood, California in early 1924 when construction was just beginning on the dormitory.

 

"BOZARTH MANSION IN BLOOM" (GONZAGA UNIVERSITY, THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • APRIL 2010 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

In 1911-1913, this mansion was built for historic Spokane developer J.P. Graves by the renowned local architect Kirtland K. Cutter for about $100,000. The famed Olmsted Brothers of Brookline, MA designed the extensive gardens and an elaborate underground water system.

In addition to owning one of Spokane’s trolley lines, Graves was also reputed to have the largest herd of jersey cattle on the west coast. The estate was originally called “Waikiki” in honor of the island Graves visited in the Hawaiian Islands and also because of the nearly two-dozen streams that ran through his property near the Little Spokane River. NOTE ~ “Waikiki” means lots of rushing water.

In 1963, the mansion was purchased by Gonzaga University (Gonzaga.Edu) and began functioning as its retreat center. This setting has also hosted dozens of weddings and other special events over the decades when not functioning as the retreat center. Its gardens have always been legendary

Highlight ~ In the 1960s, our family lived next door to the Bozarth family ~ distant relatives of the folks who owned this property after J.P. Graves.

 

 

THE NORTH SIDE'S PUBLIC PLACES ~ CHURCHES, SCHOOLS AND BELOVED BUSINESSES, INCLUDING THE SPOKANE COUNTY COURTHOUSE

"FRESH FLOWERS AT SAINT JOSEPH'S" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED MARCH 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

I painted this portrait of Saint Joseph’s Catholic Church to honor its 125th birthday. Jesuit Leopold Van Gorp purchased the West Central neighborhood property at the corner of Dean Avenue and Walnut Street in 1890 and sold it to the Corporation of Roman Catholic Bishops of Nisqually, Washington Territory.

A frame church was originally built on the site, but as the parish grew, German-born Julius A. Zittell (named Washington’s “State Architect” in 1987) was tapped to design a new church and later a convent. The church was constructed in 1901 of brick masonry in the Late Gothic Revival style and the convent in 1924 in the Collegiate Gothic style.

This church featured many fine Gothic architectural details including its handsome steeple, stepped buttresses and beautifully detailed stained-glass windows. It was enlarged in 1909, but other than that, very few exterior alterations were made over its more than 100 years of service. Only Our Lady of Lourdes (1881) parish held the distinction of being older than Saint Joseph’s in the young, thriving community.

Highlight ~ A 1901 issue of the Spokesman Review described Saint Joseph’s Catholic Church as “one of the prettiest small churches in the Northwest.”

 

"DOYLE'S DARLING ICE CREAM" (THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 2015 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

Located in the midst of Spokane’s West Central neighborhood on the North Side on the corner of Boone and Nettleton, this whimsical red and white signature “landmark” was built in 1939 as the Pacific Northwest was climbing out of the Great Depression.

For decades, it overlooked the trolley line tracks on Boone Avenue that carried passengers to and from beloved Natatorium Park. It was a favorite spot for folks to stop and purchase ice cream treats.

Nat Park closed in 1968 and its site became the San Souci Mobile Home Park. The West Central area fell on difficult times, making it quite a challenge for the little ice cream shop to keep going.

Years later in the 2000s, the Kendall Yards development began to take shape. This new neighborhood overlooking the Spokane River from the north bank helped to breathe life back into the ice cream shop. It was recently spruced up with a shiny new coat of paint and other improvements.

Highlight ~ From the 1930s on, Doyle’s always had a reputation for its delicious homemade flavors. in 2013, the parlor was voted #6 for the very finest ice cream out of 11 Spokane establishments.

 

 

THE NORTH SIDE'S "HOME SWEET HOMES" ~ BUNGALOWS, DUTCH COLONIALS, FOURSQUARES, SALT BOXES, VICTORIANS AND MORE

"PEDDLING POSIES ON PARK PLACE" ( THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED JUNE 2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

"Peddling Posies on Park Place" (THE NORTH SIDE) • PAINTED JUNE 2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Corbin Park Historic District has always been a remarkably pretty pocket of homes on Spokane’s North Side. The park’s property once served as the Washington-Idaho Fairgrounds and Racetrack from 1886 to 1897 before it became Corbin Park. Noted landscape architects, the Olmsted Bros., shared ideas to enhance the park’s original plan.

Most of the residences were built before 1927 once the racetrack became the park. Daniel Corbin platted the neighborhood in the early 1899, and visitors here have found everything from imposing three-story Victorians to charming cottages like this one on Park Place.

I fell in love with the pretty place when shooting photos for SPA’s 2018 Autumn Tour of Historic Homes. The “witches hat” on the right side of the roof and wrap-around porch were unique architectural touches. I painted blossoms everywhere in this piece and added the vintage trailer and Schwinn bike. This artwork pictured pals Peggy Caprye and Jeannie Fruci with me ~ our arms filled with flowers, of course!

Highlight ~ The Corbin Park District has been named on the Local, State and National Registers of Historic Places.

 

NEW! "FUN FAMILY CELEBRATION" (INDIAN TRAIL, THE NORTH SIDE, SPOKANE, WA • PAINTED OCTOBER 2021 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This friendly artwork portrayed a charming ranch-style home in the Indian Trail neighborhood near the Five-Mile area on Spokane’s North Side. When I painted this, good friends the Capryes had shared life there 21 years.

“Celebration” was the theme that day as it was dad Mike Caprye’s birthday in Spring 2020 ~ the family’s first get-together since COVID-19 put a damper on fun gatherings like this.

I positioned parents Mike and Peggy behind their kids with their sweethearts, plus nine grand-kiddos holding a flag banner that spelled “C-E-L-E-B-R-A-T-I-O-N-!”

Highlight ~ Note the University of Washington “Husky” colors sprinkled throughout the piece (Mike and Peggy’s alma-mater).

 

 

THE SPOKANE VALLEY ~ PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES, INCLUDING ARBOR CREST CELLLARS, AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN THESE NEIGHBORHOODS ~ FRUIT HILL ROAD, KOKOMO, MILLWOOD, NORTHWOOD, UNIVERSITY AND MORE

The Entire Spokane Valley Collection pdf ~ Click on the 5-page pdf to see and learn about all 17 paintings in the "Spokane Valley" collection.

"CLIFF HOUSE AT ARBOR CREST CELLARS" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED SEPTEMBER 2012 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The handsome, Florentine-style Cliff House was built to take full advantage of the view of the Spokane Valley. It was designed and built by Royal Newton Riblet in 1924. An inventor and mechanical genius,

Riblet’s estate was filled with marvels for its time like his garage with its mechanical door. He also installed a waterfall that recycled water back to the top of the falls and a life-size chess game on his grounds. The property with its three-story mansion, basaltic rock out-buildings and marvelous gardens later became the headquarters of Arbor Cellars (ArborCrest.com).

Highlight ~ When Riblet was living there, the cement factory far below on the riverside spewed harmful dust into the air, deteriorating his mansion’s facade. He sued ~ and the attorneys who won the first ever case of its kind were associates James Winton and my father Joseph A. Simpson.

 

"MILLWOOD'S ROSEBUSH COTTAGE, MARGUERITE STREET" (SPOKANE VALLEY, WA • PAINTED MAY 2013 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

This Tudor-influenced Norman-Revival cottage was built in 1923 by Waldo Rosebush, general manager of the Inland Empire Paper Company. The paper company was Millwood’s largest employer for nearly a century.

Rosebush had spent time in France during World War I where he discovered the prototype for this finely detailed, beautifully crafted cottage in the Argonne Forest. He purchased the architectural plans from the French owner and built his home a short distance from the main thoroughfare through Millwood, aptly named Argonne

.In 1936, Rosebush left the mill to work with the army in Alaska and the Pacific, ultimately retiring to Appleton, Wisconsin. However, he loved his charming cottage so much that he kept it as his official residence ~ returning annually to visit friends and vote in Spokane’s local elections until he passed away in 1961. Highlight ~ This cottage was built in a tiny pocket of historic homes just off Argonne a few blocks from the paper mill in Millwood.

Highlight ~ The residence was probably the most noteworthy one in the Spokane Valley other than Royal Riblet's Cliff House at Arbor Crest Cellars.

 

 

GREATER INLAND NORTHWEST AND NORTH IDAHO ~ PRETTY PUBLIC PLACES, SMALL BUSINESSES, WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY, AND "HOME SWEET HOMES" IN LATAH CREEK VALLEY , PEND O'REILlLE RIVER, NEWMAN LAKE, AND IDAHO'S COEUR D'ALENE, HAYDEN, SANDPOINT, AND MORE

The Entire Greater Inland NW/North Idaho Collection pdf ~ Click on the 4-page pdf to see and learn about all 19 paintings in the "Greater Inland Northwest & North Idaho" collection.

"MAPLE TREE FARM" (HANGMAN VALLEY, SPOKANE, WA • DECEMBER 2018 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS • 8X10-INCH)

The Arpin Family (L-R Lori and Greg with daughters Sarah and Megan) pictured in this home portrait, founded their beloved home in Hangman Valley in 1992. Architect McKie Wing Roth (Maine) and builder Gene Plett created this authentic reproduction of an 18th Century New England farm where the family lived for 28 years.

Joining them were Golden Retriever Grace, kitties Milly and Lilly, and a flock of buff-colored hens ruled by rooster Bob Dylan. A farm indeed, the Arpins planted maple (thus the name), oak and spruce trees, a small crop of alfalfa, a vineyard, an apple orchard and a truly lovely enclosed garden of raised beds with a greenhouse in the center.

Additionally, the farm had a little red barn, a swimming pool and pump house with special touches like a black school bell (Lori was a teacher at Cataldo Catholic School for 30 years), a cannon, weather vanes, birdhouses and toile curtains that dressed the windows of this remarkable home. With newlyweds Sarah and Megan married and starting their families ~ and retirement looming for the couple, it was time to downsize to a smaller cottage near Cannon Hill Park.

Highlight ~ To honor their wonderful life in Hangman Valley, Lori commissioned this memory-filled portrait of their beloved Maple Tree Farm.

 

"VISITING THE COZY CABIN ON SUNVALE" (PEND OREILLE RIVER, WA • PAINTED DECEMBER 2020 • ACRYLIC ON CANVAS •8X10 -INCH)

When I was a toddler on Spokane’s Lincoln Street, the first playmates I had were the Roberts’ kids who moved to the Dutch Colonial on the corner lot next to ours on Lincoln Street ~ Tracy, Molly, Mac and Sue Anne. Molly was my favorite and we’ve been friends for decades.

She married Cecil Hannan, and after years of living in San Diego, the couple moved back to Spokane’s South Hill. One evening, Cecil asked Molly, “Where is ‘The Lake’”? My friends are all going there this weekend.” Molly explained that “The Lake” was an umbrella term for dozens of lakes and rivers in the Inland Northwest within a couple hours drive of Spokane. Many families in the area had vacation cottages.

“Should we have one?” Cecil asked. Thus the birth of this pretty cabin overlooking the Pend Oreille River ~ one of Molly’s favorite places on the planet and frequently filled with family and friends.

Highlight ~ I finished the painting to honor a fun weekend Doug and I spent with Molly at her hideaway. A friendly moose was lurking near this river property during our visit and I pictured him just to the right of the cabin in this artwork. I added Molly's daughter Mimi and husband Mark when they moved from San Diego to Spokane.

 

 

Click on BIG LIST • SPOKANE COLLECTION OR the Red Pointer graphic header here to access ALL the titiles in thIs collection. Titles of art in this SUMMER 2022 edition are in RED CAPS alphabetically by group. These link you with bold red type to pages throughout the web site.

 

 

BEST WISHES FOR THE BEST SUMMER EVER!!

 

 

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